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De Tullio Law Firm and the New York Times

De Tullio Law Firm and the New York Times

De Tullio Law Firm‘s second contribution for the New York Times

One year after our first contribution for the New York Times, De Tullio Law Firm was interviewed for the second time to provide, once again, potential investors in Italy with useful guidelines regarding the buying basics of the Italian conveyancing process.De Tullio Law Firm and the New York Times - Riviera Ligure by night

This time, the article is focused on the Riviera Ligure, one of the most sought-after places of the Italian country, but the legal information provided herein are extended to the whole Italian territory.

The article includes critical information, such as Italian Notary‘s fees (Italian Notaio’s fees), legal fees and Italian property taxes.

Buying basics in the Italian Riviera

There are no restrictions on most foreigners buying real estate in Italy, said Giandomenico De Tullio, a managing partner at the De Tullio Law Firm, which has offices in Italy and Britain.

Transactions are handled by a notary, whose fee is negotiable, but typically starts at around 1,500 euros (or about $1,860) and varies depending on the price of the property and the complexity of the deal, said Gianluca Giovannini, a notary in Livorno. For complicated transactions and sales involving foreigners, it is a good idea to hire a bilingual lawyer as well, said Mr. De Tullio, who estimated that a lawyer’s fee would be about 1 percent of the sales price. In addition, there is a 22 percent value-added tax on both services.

De Tullio Law Firm and the New York Times - Riviera Ligure

The stamp duty is the buyer’s biggest closing cost, at 2 or 9 percent of the property’s assessed value, depending on whether it will be a primary residence or a second home, Mr. De Tullio said. (To get the primary-residence tax break, buyers must typically establish legal residence in the municipality within 18 months of buying the property, he said.)

Other closing costs include a building registry tax of 50 euros (about $62) and several other taxes and fees that add up to a few hundred euros. A rough estimate of closing costs on a 1 million euro property is around 30,000 euros (about $37,000), Mr. De Tullio said, but he added that it can vary greatly.” 

Read the full article here.

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